Using Filters for Interior Architecture Photography

Article by: Adam Goldberg
agoldbergphoto.com

Shooting interiors can create many challenges for photographers with all of the different light. Direct sunlight, indirect ambient light, overhead lights, lamps…you get the idea.  You also can have many different surfaces that absorb or reflect the light in different ways. Desks, couches, TVs, coffee tables, wood headboards, painted walls…yup, there is a lot.  As such, it is just as important to control all of the light sources as it is to control how the light interacts with all of the different surfaces in a room.  Not only is it important in some cases to add artificial light to architecture photos, but it is just as crucial – if not more so – to use filters to control all of the different elements of an interior photograph. To illustrate why I use filters for interior architecture photography, let’s walk through a photo.

I was asked to shoot the interior of a room that had been recently renovated at a hotel in my hometown of Atlanta, Georgia. This room provides a great example of why it is important to use filters when shooting interior architecture photography.

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Sit Down with Steve Holleran

We wanted to talk about Fire Chasers. This was a captivating documentary that showcased the fury of the devastating California wildfire in 2016. How does feel looking back on that journey?

Having over a year to look back at it now I think that it was a learning experience. Technically we tried a lot of new equipment and brought a lot of innovative new gear out there that I haven’t really tested in that environment before. Definitely put some film making gear on my chest in the sense of trying to shoot a documentary like this in such a dynamic environment.

On a personal level, it was a life changing experience. I grew up in California in San Diego and I’d seen some of the big fires down there from a distance which stopped us from going to school for a week from ash and what not. People lost their homes, but I never seen it up close up like this. To see not only the ferocity of the fire and how quickly it moved and how big it is and how loud it is, that was terrifying and at the same time really captivating. It’s a moving, breathing force when it’s moving through the landscape and I haven’t visualized fire in that way.

The second part is really the human element and what it does to peoples’ lives. We saw pure tragedy, which really was really put into perspective being a Southern California person. It also taught me a lot about filming with multiple cameras and fast changing dynamic environments. I definitely carry it with me wherever I go especially on future projects. I just did another documentary following 3 chefs through France and ironically I used some of the things I learned on Fire Chasers. I’m grateful for my time out there and also very wary of these environmental disasters due to climate change.

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NATural ND Filters vs. ND Filters

Article by: Adam Goldberg
Check out Adam’s work at agoldbergphoto.com

Neutral density filters are one of the most important tools in a photographer’s toolkit. They allow a photographer to control the amount of light that reaches the camera sensor. Whether it is a bright sunny day and you want to manage the bright-light or you are photographing water and are looking for that silky smooth look, the neutral density filter can help you achieve the image you are looking for.

Most neutral density filters have some color cast to them. It is a grey or blue tint to the images. Other neutral density filters try and manage the amount of infrared and create a green or cyan tine to the images. These filters require editing in post-production to try and recreate the scene.

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Drone Filters & Why you need them

Why do you need Drone Filters?

On older drones, such as the Phantom 3 and 4, the aperture is locked at F 2.8, meaning that the only way to successfully obtain proper exposure is to increase your shutter speed. This increase in shutter speed, will often time result in what is known as the “jello effect”, or to simply put it, shaky footage. Depending on the angle you are filming at, your camera may even pick up the edge of your propeller blades, leaving you with an obstructed view and choppy footage.

Newer drones, such as the Phantom 4 PRO and Phantom 4 Advanced, give operators the ability to manually adjust aperture settings, allowing for an enhanced cinematic look. While these exciting new opportunities for filming at a slower shutter speed broaden one’s potential for image capture, they can also present the challenge of maintaining proper light balance. In order to help combat this potential overexposure of light, a Neutral Density filter can now be placed and regularly used on one’s drone camera.

By using a Neutral Density Filter, a certain amount of light will be blocked from reaching your sensor. By limiting the amount of light that comes in contact with the sensor, you will be able to film at slower shutter speeds, and a lower aperture, helping you to successfully achieve a cinematic look.

Check out this review from our friends at Dronegear

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Hazed & Confused

Article by Barry Andersson

To learn more about Barry and his work please visit his website, follow him on Instagram and like him on Facebook.

I love watching movies and TV shows where the characters are walking around dark rooms and you plainly see their flashlights and other light sources.Most are aware that this is done with a hazer or light fogger. What many people don’t realize, however, is that you can achieve a similar look with a camera filter. I decided I wanted to do a comparison to explore the pro’s & cons of each technique. For the experiment, I used a Rosco V-Hazer and two Tiffen Pro-Mist Camera Filters: ¼ Black Pro-Mist and a ½ Black Pro-Mist filter.

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Behind the Scenes with Dixie Dixon

Article by: Dixie Dixon

To learn more about Dixie and her work be sure to visit  http://www.dixiedixon.com/ and follow her on Instagram at @iamdixiedixon.

Shooting High Fashion with the Tiffen 8pt Star Filter and the Lowel GL-1 Power LED

The elusive and exciting world of fashion and advertising photography can be seen everywhere these days from magazines to coffee-table books, catalogs, websites and billboards all over the world. It is impossible to miss the glamour, intrigue, and romance brought to life in a fashion image- it is a beautiful illusion and that is what I love most about it. There are no rules, no boundaries, just pure self-expression. Experimentation is one of the best ways to craft a unique fashion story. Here are a couple of rad tools I use to create my fashion imagery:

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Tumalo Falls

Article by: Ky Ferguson

Long exposure photography is my favorite kind of photography, especially waterfalls. When I am out in the field everything stands still and all I have to focus on is my camera and the nature around me. I always challenge myself to find a composition that people overlook and or have never taken before of a waterfall and that is what leads me to the story on this specific waterfall and how I got the shot. Tumalo falls is in Bend, Oregon. It is one of the most beautiful waterfalls in the area and you can even walk behind the falls. I have visited this waterfall many times but never when there was snow and ice on the ground. The moment I saw this I knew I had to get down to the river to take a photo. I played with a couple compositions on the hill but was not satisfied and I knew I would regret not trying to get below. The hill was very steep and covered in snow and ice so it was not the safest. Once I got down to the river, I walked out across the river hopping from snow covered rock to snow covered rock and ended up standing on a thin sheet of ice and setting up my camera there.

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Sit Down with Ari Robbins

Article By: Kaitlyn Isola

For our first Steadicam feature interview, A Steadicam Life, we had the opportunity to speak with Steadicam Operator Ari Robbins. Since the beginning of his career Ari has been a loyal Tiffen Steadicam user as well an important part of our Steadicam community.

To learn more about Ari and his work please visit his website and follow him on Facebook and Instagram.

Tell me about yourself.

I grew up in Atlanta, Georgia. My Father was a surgeon and my Mother was an artist and a dancer, I like to think the two of them perfectly blended together to create a Steadicam Operator. Once my father retired, I moved with my parents to central cost of California and began taking interest in the filmmaking industry.

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Sit Down with Tyler Stableford

Article By: Kaitlyn Isola

We had the opportunity to speak with award-winning director, photographer, presenter and Canon Explorer of Light, Tyler Stableford. Tyler is a Tiffen Filter enthusiast who, through his passion for outdoor adventure, has successfully mastered the art of capturing the exceptional beauty to be found in every scene.

To learn more about Tyler and his work, be sure to visit his website, subscribe to his blog and follow him on InstagramTwitterFacebook and Vimeo.

Tell me about yourself. What was your initial inspiration to become involved in the industry?

I came to photography and cinematography though my passion for outdoor adventures. As a rock climber, skier and mountaineer, I found myself drawn to any opportunity for time spent outdoors.

After college I landed a job as the photo and equipment editor at Climbing Magazine in Carbondale, Colorado, where I currently live. Although I had started college studying writing and journalism, I found myself deeply invested in the world of photography.

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Exploring Yosemite

Article By: Michael Cassara
Article Written for the Tiffen Imagemaker Blog in 2015

One of the most photographic landscapes on the planet is Yosemite National Park, which is located in the isolated mountains of California. One of, if not the greatest landscape photographer of the 20th century, Ansel Adams, made Yosemite famous by producing iconic photographs of the parks majestic landscape.

Is there a better place in the world the show the power and potential of Tiffen Filters?

Upon arrival to the park, the Rangers at the guard station greet you with a smile. This was National Park #6 for me, and the station was a welcome sight after the long drive from Fresno’s Airport the night before. After paying the park admittance, you are introduced to the park by driving under two giant boulders that came to rest against one another. This isn’t the sort of thing you see on Long Island. Upon passing the boulders, it seemed to take around 20 minutes before reaching the valley floor. Snow on the first day really made for less than ideal conditions. However, in Yosemite, the weather is constantly changing and breaks in the clouds offered some unique long exposure opportunities using the Tiffen Apex filter.

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