The Best of Shotkit

Our friends over at Shotkit are celebrating their 4th anniversary. We absolutely love their website and how they featured professional photographers gear through the years. As we browsed the post we noticed many photographers using Tiffen gear, especially Domke Bags and the Lowel GL-1! Check out some of our favorites below:

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Using the Lowel Go Lite on Location

Article by: Jeff Mauritzen

I was really excited to get my hands on the Lowel Go Lite. It’s a really affordable, portable and easy to use, accessory light. While it’s not powerful enough to light an entire landscape, it does work well as an accent light in low light situations.

Scenario 1:  In February, I went out west on a photo trip with a friend to Arizona and Utah. I knew I was going to do be doing a lot of hiking and with a bag already laden down with lots of camera gear, and I definitely didn’t want to bring any extra weight with me. The Go Lite was the easy to carry solution!

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Behind the Scenes with Leo Kawabe

Today we had the chance to sit down with Cinematographer Leo Kawabe about his latest piece, “Dust”. Leo used Tiffen Filters throughout the production. “Dust” is a short film that mixes poetry and visual drama to tell the story of Zen and Brooke; two souls connected by the same pain. Between the sky and the salt beds lies a world of dust; where sometimes, what is left is either death or a reminder of it. The reasons for choosing death are not always clear, but we can look deeper into the human vessels that reach this threshold.”

Tell us a little about the concept of this piece… What was the look you were going for?

First of all, this was a very limited film in terms of budget, crew, time and equipment.

It was done by me and the director (Renato Cabral). We rented a car and traveled from LA to Las Vegas to shoot in 6 days.

The first 3 days were used for tech scout which was crucial since the locations were very far from one another and we needed to calculate the logistics, especially to be able to get the best light.

The look the Director and I had spoken about was to have an organic feel to the images; making the most out of the natural light and the locations.

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How to Edit the Milky Way

Article By: Tiffen Flight Team Member, Kawika Lopez
Shared from: 9th Ave Studios Blog

When I first got into photography, one of the most exciting moments I can remember was being at the top of Haleakala on Maui. It was just around freezing temperatures when we arrived at about 3am. After setting up my camera on a tripod and waiting for a 30 second exposure, the image review popped up. I saw my first shot of the Milky Way on the rear display of my 5D mark III and I was hooked.

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Sit Down with Renan Ozturk

Today we had the honor to sit down with NatGeo Photographer and North Face Climber Renan Ozturk.

Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I’m a mix of a landscape artist turned professional climber turned cinematographer and director. I started painting pictures and having a life on the road and living in national parks under rocks, literally. Learning climbing and appreciating landscape and wild places in a roundabout way working towards capturing stories I can share with people though film. Now I’m just traveling around telling different stories based on climbing but others that are broader ranging and have to do with culture or conservation.

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Behind the Scenes with Ryan Struck

Tell us a little about the concept of this piece… What was the look you were going for?

Ryan Babenzien CEO of the GREATS brand was approached by Timex to design a new watch. Ryan drew on his experience growing up on the waters of Long Island to create the Baymen. It’s accented with nods to his own passion for the water as well as his love for time pieces. Ryan and I chatted about the story and look he was after, he referenced the 60’s and 70’s surf glow of slide film. This was such an exciting concept to me, as I’ve shot quite a bit of slide film myself, and am such a fan of this aesthetic. I knew there was a few technical things we could do within the camera department to really make this film glow, early morning light and Tiffen Filters being key.

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Using Filters for Interior Architecture Photography

Article by: Adam Goldberg
agoldbergphoto.com

Shooting interiors can create many challenges for photographers with all of the different light. Direct sunlight, indirect ambient light, overhead lights, lamps…you get the idea.  You also can have many different surfaces that absorb or reflect the light in different ways. Desks, couches, TVs, coffee tables, wood headboards, painted walls…yup, there is a lot.  As such, it is just as important to control all of the light sources as it is to control how the light interacts with all of the different surfaces in a room.  Not only is it important in some cases to add artificial light to architecture photos, but it is just as crucial – if not more so – to use filters to control all of the different elements of an interior photograph. To illustrate why I use filters for interior architecture photography, let’s walk through a photo.

I was asked to shoot the interior of a room that had been recently renovated at a hotel in my hometown of Atlanta, Georgia. This room provides a great example of why it is important to use filters when shooting interior architecture photography.

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Sit Down with Steve Holleran

We wanted to talk about Fire Chasers. This was a captivating documentary that showcased the fury of the devastating California wildfire in 2016. How does feel looking back on that journey?

Having over a year to look back at it now I think that it was a learning experience. Technically we tried a lot of new equipment and brought a lot of innovative new gear out there that I haven’t really tested in that environment before. Definitely put some film making gear on my chest in the sense of trying to shoot a documentary like this in such a dynamic environment.

On a personal level, it was a life changing experience. I grew up in California in San Diego and I’d seen some of the big fires down there from a distance which stopped us from going to school for a week from ash and what not. People lost their homes, but I never seen it up close up like this. To see not only the ferocity of the fire and how quickly it moved and how big it is and how loud it is, that was terrifying and at the same time really captivating. It’s a moving, breathing force when it’s moving through the landscape and I haven’t visualized fire in that way.

The second part is really the human element and what it does to peoples’ lives. We saw pure tragedy, which really was really put into perspective being a Southern California person. It also taught me a lot about filming with multiple cameras and fast changing dynamic environments. I definitely carry it with me wherever I go especially on future projects. I just did another documentary following 3 chefs through France and ironically I used some of the things I learned on Fire Chasers. I’m grateful for my time out there and also very wary of these environmental disasters due to climate change.

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NATural ND Filters vs. ND Filters

Article by: Adam Goldberg
Check out Adam’s work at agoldbergphoto.com

Neutral density filters are one of the most important tools in a photographer’s toolkit. They allow a photographer to control the amount of light that reaches the camera sensor. Whether it is a bright sunny day and you want to manage the bright-light or you are photographing water and are looking for that silky smooth look, the neutral density filter can help you achieve the image you are looking for.

Most neutral density filters have some color cast to them. It is a grey or blue tint to the images. Other neutral density filters try and manage the amount of infrared and create a green or cyan tine to the images. These filters require editing in post-production to try and recreate the scene.

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Drone Filters & Why you need them

Why do you need Drone Filters?

On older drones, such as the Phantom 3 and 4, the aperture is locked at F 2.8, meaning that the only way to successfully obtain proper exposure is to increase your shutter speed. This increase in shutter speed, will often time result in what is known as the “jello effect”, or to simply put it, shaky footage. Depending on the angle you are filming at, your camera may even pick up the edge of your propeller blades, leaving you with an obstructed view and choppy footage.

Newer drones, such as the Phantom 4 PRO and Phantom 4 Advanced, give operators the ability to manually adjust aperture settings, allowing for an enhanced cinematic look. While these exciting new opportunities for filming at a slower shutter speed broaden one’s potential for image capture, they can also present the challenge of maintaining proper light balance. In order to help combat this potential overexposure of light, a Neutral Density filter can now be placed and regularly used on one’s drone camera.

By using a Neutral Density Filter, a certain amount of light will be blocked from reaching your sensor. By limiting the amount of light that comes in contact with the sensor, you will be able to film at slower shutter speeds, and a lower aperture, helping you to successfully achieve a cinematic look.

Check out this review from our friends at Dronegear

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