Category : Tutorials

How to Edit the Milky Way

Article By: Tiffen Flight Team Member, Kawika Lopez
Shared from: 9th Ave Studios Blog

When I first got into photography, one of the most exciting moments I can remember was being at the top of Haleakala on Maui. It was just around freezing temperatures when we arrived at about 3am. After setting up my camera on a tripod and waiting for a 30 second exposure, the image review popped up. I saw my first shot of the Milky Way on the rear display of my 5D mark III and I was hooked.

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Using Filters for Interior Architecture Photography

Article by: Adam Goldberg
agoldbergphoto.com

Shooting interiors can create many challenges for photographers with all of the different light. Direct sunlight, indirect ambient light, overhead lights, lamps…you get the idea.  You also can have many different surfaces that absorb or reflect the light in different ways. Desks, couches, TVs, coffee tables, wood headboards, painted walls…yup, there is a lot.  As such, it is just as important to control all of the light sources as it is to control how the light interacts with all of the different surfaces in a room.  Not only is it important in some cases to add artificial light to architecture photos, but it is just as crucial – if not more so – to use filters to control all of the different elements of an interior photograph. To illustrate why I use filters for interior architecture photography, let’s walk through a photo.

I was asked to shoot the interior of a room that had been recently renovated at a hotel in my hometown of Atlanta, Georgia. This room provides a great example of why it is important to use filters when shooting interior architecture photography.

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Drone Filters & Why you need them

Why do you need Drone Filters?

On older drones, such as the Phantom 3 and 4, the aperture is locked at F 2.8, meaning that the only way to successfully obtain proper exposure is to increase your shutter speed. This increase in shutter speed, will often time result in what is known as the “jello effect”, or to simply put it, shaky footage. Depending on the angle you are filming at, your camera may even pick up the edge of your propeller blades, leaving you with an obstructed view and choppy footage.

Newer drones, such as the Phantom 4 PRO and Phantom 4 Advanced, give operators the ability to manually adjust aperture settings, allowing for an enhanced cinematic look. While these exciting new opportunities for filming at a slower shutter speed broaden one’s potential for image capture, they can also present the challenge of maintaining proper light balance. In order to help combat this potential overexposure of light, a Neutral Density filter can now be placed and regularly used on one’s drone camera.

By using a Neutral Density Filter, a certain amount of light will be blocked from reaching your sensor. By limiting the amount of light that comes in contact with the sensor, you will be able to film at slower shutter speeds, and a lower aperture, helping you to successfully achieve a cinematic look.

Check out this review from our friends at Dronegear

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Hazed & Confused

Article by Barry Andersson

To learn more about Barry and his work please visit his website, follow him on Instagram and like him on Facebook.

I love watching movies and TV shows where the characters are walking around dark rooms and you plainly see their flashlights and other light sources.Most are aware that this is done with a hazer or light fogger. What many people don’t realize, however, is that you can achieve a similar look with a camera filter. I decided I wanted to do a comparison to explore the pro’s & cons of each technique. For the experiment, I used a Rosco V-Hazer and two Tiffen Pro-Mist Camera Filters: ¼ Black Pro-Mist and a ½ Black Pro-Mist filter.

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